NAFOL profile: Camilla Wiig

Astrid Camilla Wiig.photo.“Connecting everyday an academic knowledge practices, – a teacher challenge”

Camilla Wiig is a PhD student at Buskerud and Vestfold University College (HBV). She has previously worked as a consultant and change manager in Telenor Business Consulting and as lecturer in Science of Education at the Teacher Training Education and Pedagogical Supervising for teachers at HBV. In her research project, Camilla investigates how teachers use student’s everyday knowledge and experience as resources for meaning-making and learning in classroom interactions.

Her PhD study is part of the ongoing research project KnowMo: Knowledge in Motion across Contexts of Learning (2012-2016), financed by The Research Council of Norway, FINNUT. The aim of the KnowMo project is to study the conditions under which learning experiences in out-of-school settings can be made relevant for learning in lower secondary schools. It has been suggested that many students at this level experience school as disconnected from the other domains in their lives, lacking relevance and variation (Ministry of Education and Research, 2011). One way of facing the dual demands of fulfilling curriculum requirements and creating motivation, is to bring young people’s experiences outside school into the classroom. It is not clear, however, how teachers can do this, and in what way this strategy will enhance in –school learning. In order to address these important issues, Camilla’s PhD project aims to present knowledge about the consequences of different ways of bringing out-of-school learning processes into the classroom. Besides studying young students in different contexts out-of-school, such as family and sport activities, a major practical aim is to build knowledge about how the teachers can cope with and integrate topics and activities from outside school into subject matters in the classrooms. As such, the project is particularly relevant for the Norwegian teacher education programmes (GLU 5-10 and 8-13) as well as in the public discourse about learning in “the 21st century Skills”, both in Norway and internationally.

Abstract (doc-file)